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Gardening reduces risk of obesity

Pottering around in an allotment could cut the risk of obesity, according to a study which found that gardeners weigh about a stone less than their neighbours on average. As well as providing a form of regular exercise, gardening could encourage people to eat more healthily if they grow their own vegetables, researchers said. It could also provide an important social benefit for those who share an allotment ...

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Google Maps Find History, Old Maps, Pinball Joints, Ships and Planes

There's always a fascinating world to explore using the technology of Google Maps and the creativity of Websites. Google Maps can take Website visitors to amazing places for adventures and exploration or to see beautiful places and cool possibilities around the world. And it's all done using the magic of the Google Maps API, which allows Website builders to bring "life" to maps and give them new uses, meani ...

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Why Your Brain Loves Music

New neuroscience study sets out to explain why in some respects music offers the same sort of pleasure as a really good thriller. The love affair between music and neuroscience just keeps going and going. And this isn’t surprising because music’s power over us is so huge, and so odd. It’s not like those other great providers of pleasure, food and sex. It doesn’t help to propagate our genes. Nor does it tell ...

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Why does social science have such a hard job explaining itself?

Contrary to US Senate rulings, we need more and better funded social science, not less, says Ziyad Marar – without discussing how it differs from natural science, it remains easy to relegate So it has finally happened. After years of failed attempts by senators Tom Coburn and Jeff Flake to defund political science from the US National Science Foundation (NSF) budget, March's breakthrough 'voice vote' gave t ...

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Great Scientist / Good at Math

For many young people who aspire to be scientists, the great bugbear is mathematics. Without advanced math, how can you do serious work in the sciences? Well, I have a professional secret to share: Many of the most successful scientists in the world today are mathematically no more than semiliterate. During my decades of teaching biology at Harvard, I watched sadly as bright undergraduates turned away from ...

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New Mobile Apps Could Pose Threat for Facebook

Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg has publicly called Facebook a "mobile company'' to emphasize the company's priorities. Last year, he splashed $1 billion for photo-sharing app Instagram, which has remained red hot, while Facebook also launched its own Messenger app, offering a suite of smartphone communication tools. Still, Facebook has also been forced to play defense. Earlier this year, the company cut of ...

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Scientists Find how Deadly New Virus Infects Human Cells

Scientists have worked out how a deadly new virus which was unknown in humans until last year is able to infect human cells and cause severe, potentially fatal damage to the lungs. In one of the first detailed studies of the virus - which emerged in the Middle East and has so far infected 15 people worldwide, killing nine of them - Dutch researchers identified a cell surface protein it uses to enter and inf ...

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U.S. restarts plutonium production for space probes

The Department of Energy has produced its first batch of non-weapons grade plutonium, used to power space probes, since a nuclear reactor shutdown 25 years ago, NASA officials said on Monday. The U.S. space agency turned to buying radioactive plutonium-238 from Russia after safety issues prompted the Department of Energy to close its Savannah River Site in South Carolina in the late 1980s. The Russian suppl ...

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Samsung premiers feature-packed Galaxy S4

New York/Seoul: Samsung Electronics Co premiered its latest flagship phone, the Galaxy S4, which sports a bigger display and unconventional features such as gesture controls, as the South Korean titan challenges Apple Inc on its home turf. The phone, the first in the highly successful Galaxy S-series to make its global debut on US soil, was unwrapped at Manhattan's iconic Radio City Music Hall on Thursday e ...

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Vodafone rejects Yahoo ban on home working

Perhaps Marissa Mayer was not expecting to make such huge waves in the business world when she banned Yahoo employees from home working, but the debate has become a global one, and now Vodafone has weighed in. It says that freeing up desk space and reducing overhead costs when workers aren't around could save £34bn a year. It came to its conclusion by surveying 500 'decision makers' in businesses across the ...

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Goodbye IT, Hello Digital Business

It's not about information technology anymore. It's about digital business. The new description is a testament to IT's advancement from a back-office, support-the-business role into a developer of products and apps that customers use directly. It's also a reflection of the central role of data analytics in letting companies see and anticipate customer tastes more quickly than ever before. This digital busin ...

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Researchers in the Netherlands have used electron tomography to obtain images of nanocrystal superlattices. This new use of an established imaging technique looks set to provide researchers with important 3D structural information about these technologically important materials. Often called artificial solids, nanocrystal superlattices can be engineered to have a range of electronic, photonic and other desi ...

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Send a text message to charge your cellphone

People living off-grid can now pay for electricity to power their phones simply by sending a text message – the cheapest method found so far AT THE Konokoyi coffee cooperative on the edge of Uganda's Mount Elgon national park, Juliet Nandutu is trying out a new toy: a solar-powered cellphone charging station that is activated by text message. She is offering the service to her village. "I charge 18 phones a ...

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100 million sharks killed each year, say scientists

Protect sharks or they face possible extinction in a generation, scientists warn as they gather in Bangkok for Cites meeting Almost 100 million sharks are being killed each year, with fishing rates outstripping the ability of populations to recover, scientists have estimated. Sharks need better protection to prevent possible extinction of many species within coming decades, the researchers warned ahead of l ...

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How long can modern submarines remain underwater?

Thanks to their state-of-the-art, built-in reactors, modern nuclear submarines never have to surface to refuel. When the submarine goes into service, it has all the nuclear fuel (such as uranium) it will need for its projected lifetime, which can extend as long as 33 years. Just as in a nuclear powerplant on land, nuclear fission in the reactor generates heat, which produces steam, which turns a turbine, wh ...

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Samsung takes on Apple with new tablet

Samsung announces new eight-inch screen tablet Samsung Electronics is beefing up its tablet range with a competitor to Apple's iPad Mini that sports a pen for writing on the screen. The Korean company announced on Sunday in Barcelona, Spain that the Galaxy Note 8.0 will have an eight-inch screen, putting it very close in size to Apple's tablet, which launched in November with a 7.9-inch screen. It's not the ...

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Research Helps toExplain Early-OnsetPuberty in Females

New research from Oregon Health & Science University has provided significant insight into the reasons why early-onset puberty occurs in females. The research, which was conducted at OHSU's Oregon National Primate Research Center, is published in the current early online edition of the journal Nature Neuroscience. The paper explains how OHSU scientists are investigating the role of epigenetics in the co ...

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Elephant Spotting Robots in Africa

Researchers in Africa are trying out an Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) for doing aerial surveys of large mammals. The drone chosen by the researchers was a Gatewing X100, a small, electric robot plane equipped with GPS, inertial measurement, and other sensors. Aerial surveys using traditional manned aircraft are very expensive to do, so this research could potentially result in new survey methods that will ...

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Dark Energy Hunter: 7 Questions for Nobel Prize Winner Saul Perlmutter

Dark energy is still mystifying, even to those that first discovered it. Saul Perlmutter, an astrophysicist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California, won the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics for helping reveal that the expansion of the universe was accelerating (he shared the prize with Brian Schmidt of the Australian National University and Adam Riess of the Space Telescope Science Institute). Wha ...

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HP Pavilion 14 Chromebook price revealed, has a 14-inch HD display

A price for the HP Pavilion 14 Chromebook running on Google’s desktop OS has been revealed. The notebook is the most expensive choice in the current range which comprises of devices from Acer and Samsung. While the laptops from the latter 2 manufacturers house an 11.6-inch display, the Pavilion 14 Chromebook stands tall with a larger screen size of 14 inches, making it the first of its kind. The screen empl ...

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